The silence of the wilting skin

by Tsamaase, Tlotlo,

Format: Print Book 2020
Availability: On Order 7 copies
2 people on waitlist
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Summary
In an African city, a nameless young woman living in the wards slowly begins to lose her identity: her skin color is peeling off, people are becoming invisible, and the city plans to destroy the train where they bury their dead. After the narrator, who is never named is given a warning by her grandmother's dreamskin, things begin to fall apart. Her brother is called Brother, her girlfriend is called Girlfriend, cementing the loss of names, language and culure. Struggling to hold onto a fluctuating reality, she prescribes herself insomnia in a desperate attempt to save her family.
Published Reviews
Publisher's Weekly Review: "Motswana author Tsamaase debuts with a lyrical and incisive allegory about personal identity and cultural loss set in an unnamed, phantasmagoric African city. The nameless narrator, an artist, lives next to the railway that carries the spirits of the dead. The train passes once a month, drawing crowds of people hoping for a glimpse of their departed loved ones. One night, the narrator's grandmother's dreamskin--a harbinger of death--visits the narrator, and the next day Grandmother joins the spirits of her already deceased husband and children aboard the train. This brush with the dreamskin physically changes the narrator: her hair goes gray, the color peels from her skin, and her grasp of language starts to slip. When the rich, white government of her segregated city decides to tear down the railway line, and with it the narrator's connection to her family, she stops sleeping, hoping that "staying woke" will help her marshal whatever power the dreamskin gave her to fight for her home. Through magnetic prose, dream logic, and lush imagery, Tsamaase delivers a fierce political message. Suffused with both love and righteous anger, this atmospheric anticolonialist battle cry is a tour de force. (May)"
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Additional Information
Subjects African women -- Fiction.
Identity (Psychology) v FIction.
Africans -- Fiction.
Conduct of life -- Fiction.
Cultural awareness -- Fiction.
Dreams -- Fiction.
Human skin color -- Fiction.
Families -- Fiction.
Human skin color.
Families.
Dreams.
Cultural awareness.
Conduct of life.
Africans.
Fiction.
Domestic fiction.
LGBTQIA+ fiction.
Publisher Massachusetts : b Pink Narcissus Press,2020
Edition First trade paperback edition.
Language English
Description 97 pages ; 21 cm
ISBN 9781939056177
1939056179
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