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How to say itʼ to seniors closing the communication gap with our elders

by Solie, David.

Format: Kindle Book 2004 2004
  Adobe EPUB ebook
  OverDrive Read
Availability: Available from OverDrive 1 of 1 copy
Available from OverDrive (1)
Summary
More information to be announced soon on this forthcoming title from Penguin USA
Published Reviews
Publisher's Weekly Review: "As the average age of Americans slowly rises, libraries will need responsive collections. Herrick (Boise: A Global Community in the West) celebrates the collective joys and hard-learned wisdom of femininity in lush, poetic prose that often borders on precious. Although confident ("I am nothing but adrenaline and exuberance"), she does not provide how-to. The final chapter should have come first, as it explains that Herrick can't have children. Bolton used to write jokes for comedic greats Bob Hope and Phyllis Diller; her riffs on life for seniors wouldn't be out of place in the Catskills. Though packed with funny quips and one-liners (e.g., use menopausal hot flashes as an energy source), her book mainly consists of monologs, the last couple of which grow mawkish. On the whole, however, this favorably recalls Erma Bombeck's irreverence. Mayne, the author of several thrillers, has collected the autobiographies of five women who came of age in the 1950s and 1960s. Some were particularly abused, and the flood of misery that their stories unleashes only serves to document how awful life could be for women at that time. Unfortunately, themes of life lessons learned are lost in the mire of broken love stories, childhood horrors, and drunken, philandering husbands. Sewell's anthology is more incisive by comparison, revealing how 27 middle-aged women writers just "be" (as opposed to how they once were and what they took for that). While some of the essays pack a punch, most tend toward mundane, e.g., Dorothy Walls's poignant essay about masking beauty lines behind plastic surgery. Maturity has netted these authors grace, courage, and "meaning deeper than skin," but their messages are all too familiar. There is no lack of feminista-writers-on-writing books, including Jocelyn Burrell's compilation Word: On Being a (Woman) Writer.Geriatric psychologist Solie does an excellent job of debunking the myth that our elders are merely older versions of ourselves. Seniors are undergoing a developmental transition akin to adolescence; practical, effective communication methods are presented to help minimize generational conflict. This, in turn, paves the way for the important work of advocating for (instead of marginalizing) elders, who face a daily struggle for control. Though an age group isn't numerically defined (it's more a life stage), this makes an important contribution to our cultural understanding of "seniors" and is highly recommended for public libraries and professional collections. Bolton's, Herrick's, and Sewell's books are optional; Mayne's is not recommended. (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved All rights reserved."
(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Additional Information
Series How to say it.
Subjects Self-Improvement
Nonfiction
Electronic books.
Publisher New York :Penguin Publishing Group2004
2004
Contributors OverDrive, Inc.
Language English
System Details Mode of access: World Wide Web.
Format: Adobe EPUB eBook
Format: Kindle Book
Format: Kobo eBook
Format: OverDrive Read
Requires Adobe Digital Editions or Amazon Kindle or Kobo eBook
Description 1 online resource.
ISBN 9781101097885
9781101097885
Other Classic View