Slavery by another name the re-enslavement of Black people in America from the Civil War to World War II / Douglas A. Blackmon.

by Blackmon, Douglas A.

Format: Kindle Book 2009 2009
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Summary
This groundbreaking historical expose unearths the lost stories of enslaved persons and their descendants who journeyed into freedom after the Emancipation Proclamation and then back into the shadow of involuntary servitude shortly thereafter in “The Age of Neoslavery.”By turns moving, sobering, and shocking, this unprecedented Pulitzer Prize-winning account reveals the stories of those who fought unsuccessfully against the re-emergence of human labor trafficking, the companies that profited most from neoslavery, and the insidious legacy of racism that reverberates today.Following the Emancipation Proclamation, convicts—mostly black men—were “leased” through forced labor camps operated by state and federal governments. Using a vast record of original documents and personal narratives, Douglas A. Blackmon brings to light one of the most shameful chapters in American history.“An astonishing book. . . . It will challenge and change your understanding of what we were as Americans—and of what we are.” —Chicago Tribune
Published Reviews
Publisher's Weekly Review: "Wall Street Journal bureau chief Blackmon gives a groundbreaking and disturbing account of a sordid chapter in American history-the lease (essentially the sale) of convicts to "commercial interests" between the end of the 19th century and well into the 20th. Usually, the criminal offense was loosely defined vagrancy or even "changing employers without permission." The initial sentence was brutal enough; the actual penalty, "reserved almost exclusively for black men," was a form of slavery in one of "hundreds of forced labor camps" operated "by state and county governments, large corporations, small time entrepreneurs and provincial farmers." Into this history, Blackmon weaves the story of Green Cottenham, who was "charged with riding a freight train without a ticket," in 1908 and was sentenced to "three months of hard labor for Tennessee Coal, Iron & Railroad," a subsidiary of U.S. Steel. Cottenham's sentence was extended an additional three months and six days because he was unable to pay fines then leveraged on criminals. Blackmon's book reveals in devastating detail the legal and commercial forces that created this neoslavery along with deeply moving and totally appalling personal testimonies of survivors. "Every incident in this book is true," he writes; one wishes it were not so. (Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved"
(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Additional Information
Subjects African Americans Civil rights History 19th century
African Americans Civil rights History 20th century
African Americans Employment History
African Americans Crimes against History
African American prisoners Social conditions
Forced labor United States History
Convict labor United States History
Slavery United States History
Sociology
Nonfiction
History
United States Race relations History 19th century.
United States Race relations History 20th century.
Electronic books.
19th century.
20th century.
Publisher New York :Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group,2009
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group2009
Edition 1st ed.
Contributors OverDrive, Inc.
Language English
System Details Mode of access: World Wide Web.
Format: OverDrive READ
Format: Kindle Book
Format: Adobe PDF eBook
Format: Adobe EPUB eBook
Requires Amazon Kindle or Adobe Digital Editions or Adobe Digital Editions
Description 1 online resource
Bibliography Notes Includes bibliographical references (pages [407]-459) and index.
ISBN 9780307472472
9780307472472
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