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Where women are kings

by Watson, Christie,

Format: Print Book 2015
Availability: Available at 3 Libraries 3 of 3 copies
Available (3)
Location Collection Call #
CLP - East Liberty Fiction Collection FICTION Watson
Location  CLP - East Liberty
 
Collection  Fiction Collection
 
Call Number  FICTION Watson
 
 
CLP - Homewood Fiction Collection FICTION Watson
Location  CLP - Homewood
 
Collection  Fiction Collection
 
Call Number  FICTION Watson
 
 
CLP - Squirrel Hill Fiction Collection FICTION Watson
Location  CLP - Squirrel Hill
 
Collection  Fiction Collection
 
Call Number  FICTION Watson
 
 
Summary
From the award-winning author of Tiny Sunbirds, Far Away , the story of a young boy who believes two things: that his Nigerian birth mother loves him like the world has never known love, and that he is a wizard

Elijah, seven years old, is covered in scars and has a history of disruptive behavior. Taken away from his birth mother, a Nigerian immigrant in England, Elijah is moved from one foster parent to the next before finding a home with Nikki and her husband, Obi.

Nikki believes that she and Obi are strong enough to accept Elijah's difficulties--and that being white will not affect her ability to raise a black son. They care deeply for Elijah and, in spite of his demons, he begins to settle into this loving family. But as Nikki and Obi learn more about their child's tragic past, they face challenges that threaten to rock the fragile peace they've established, challenges that could prove disastrous.
Published Reviews
Booklist Review: "In her second novel, British author Watson (Tiny Sunbirds, Far Away, 2011) gracefully creates the delicate workings of a small household with an adopted Nigerian son at the center. Elijah, the seven-year-old son for whom Nikki and Obi have longed, has a horrifying past. The narration rotates among the perspectives of Elijah, Nikki, and Elijah's Nigerian-born mother, Deborah, whose letters to her son sadly display both her intense maternal love and her mental illness. Elijah's past full of abuse but also of a belief system at odds with that of his new family unfolds and, at every turn, creates fresh and seemingly insurmountable conflicts. Deborah's teachings, particularly that a wizard lives within him, permeate Elijah's thoughts, despite the acceptance and love he finds in his new life. Watson's writing, with its gorgeous detail, is well suited to portraying the complexities involved in creating familial bonds, particularly the painstaking adoption process, and the daily life of a newly formed household. She has constructed a wonderful set of characters and a remarkable story of family love amid cultural and emotional tension.--Tully, Annie Copyright 2015 Booklist"
From Booklist, Copyright (c) American Library Association. Used with permission.
Publisher's Weekly Review: "Elijah was born to loving Nigerian immigrants living in London. But, for heartbreaking reasons that become evident over the course of this poignant novel, he endured an unthinkable amount of pain and abuse before winding up on the merry-go-round of child services. At age seven, he's adopted by Nikki, who is white, and Obi, whose own family is also Nigerian-by all accounts a dependable, compassionate couple determined to protect, love, and heal Elijah. As the family members come to know one another, they each experience intense tenderness and understandable trepidation. However, as Elijah's past is revealed in more detail, everyone begins to doubt the tenacity of their bond. Interspersed throughout the narrative are letters from Deborah, Elijah's birth mother, deepening the complexity of both the adoration and suffering he's known. Watson (Tiny Sunbirds, Far Away), in addition to being a writer, also works as a nurse, and she approaches the topic with expert knowledge of what a child like Elijah would have gone through, as well as tremendous empathy for her cast of characters. Although much of the dialogue feels stilted, used to explain information or shifts in chronology rather than to reflect the characters' points of view, the book is undeniably powerful. (Apr.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved."
(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Additional Information
Subjects Foster children -- Fiction.
Foster parents -- Fiction.
Family crises -- Fiction.
Nigerians -- England -- Fiction.
England -- Fiction.
Domestic fiction.
Publisher New York :2015
Language English
Description 250 pages ; 21 cm
ISBN 9781590517093
1590517091
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