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Operation Paperclip

by Jacobsen, Annie,

Format: Book on CD 2013
Availability: Available at 5 Libraries 5 of 5 copies
Available (5)
Location Collection Call #
CLP - Main Library First Floor - Open Stacks (CD) D810.S2 J43 2013cx
Location  CLP - Main Library
 
Collection  First Floor - Open Stacks
 
Call Number  (CD) D810.S2 J43 2013cx
 
 
Crafton Public Library Adult - Non-Fiction Recorded Book RB 940.548673 JACOBSEN 2013 CRAFTON 7/16
Location  Crafton Public Library
 
Collection  Adult - Non-Fiction Recorded Book
 
Call Number  RB 940.548673 JACOBSEN 2013 CRAFTON 7/16
 
 
Penn Hills Library Audio Visual CD 940.54 JAC
Location  Penn Hills Library
 
Collection  Audio Visual
 
Call Number  CD 940.54 JAC
 
 
Shaler North Hills Library Audiovisual CD 940.5486 J [B-O-CD]
Location  Shaler North Hills Library
 
Collection  Audiovisual
 
Call Number  CD 940.5486 J [B-O-CD]
 
 
Western Allegheny Community Library Audiovisual CDBOOK 940.54 JAC
Location  Western Allegheny Community Library
 
Collection  Audiovisual
 
Call Number  CDBOOK 940.54 JAC
 
 
Summary

In the chaos following WWII, many of Germany's remaining resources were divvied up among allied forces. Some of the greatest spoils were the Third Reich's scientific minds--the minds that made their programs in aerospace and rocketry the best in the world. The United States secretly decided that the value of these former Nazis' forbidden knowledge outweighed their crimes, and the government formed a covert organization called Operation Paperclip to allow them to work without the knowledge of the American public.

Drawing on exclusive interviews with dozens of Paperclip family members, with access to German archival documents (including, notably, papers available only to direct descendants of the former Third Reich's ranking members), files obtained through the Freedom of Information Act, and lost dossiers she recently discovered at the National Archives, Annie Jacobsen will follow more than a dozen German scientists through their postwar lives and into one of the most complex, nefarious, and jealously guarded government secrets of the 20th century.

Published Reviews
Booklist Review: "*Starred Review* By the end of 1945, the alliance of the Western powers with the Soviet Union had frayed, and the basic outlines of what would become the Cold War had taken shape. At the same time, military, scientific, and political leaders in the U.S. had become acutely aware of the value of German scientists responsible for great advances in rocketry and biological research under the Nazis. So, in August 1945, President Truman authorized the Joint Intelligence Objectives Agency (JIOA), a division of the Office of Strategic Services (OSS), to aggressively recruit German scientists to come to the U.S. and to work for various government-affiliated programs. Truman had stipulated that members of the Nazi Party were not to be included. As Jacobsen, an investigative journalist, illustrates, the JIOA adroitly sidestepped Truman's directive through an intense program of fraud and deception. Documents were forged or altered, wartime activities were covered up, and, in some cases, entirely new identities were created, all in the service of our national interest. Some of these men were only marginal Nazis, but some were fervent true believers directly responsible for war crimes. This is an engrossing and deeply disturbing expose that poses ultimate questions of means versus ends.--Freeman, Jay Copyright 2010 Booklist"
From Booklist, Copyright (c) American Library Association. Used with permission.
Publisher's Weekly Review: "As comprehensive as it is critical, this latest expose from Jacobsen (Area 51) is perhaps her most important work to date. Though Americans are quick to remember the United States' heroic feats in WWII, they tend to be more amnesic (or allergic) toward some of our nation's shadier activities in the effort-one of which seems to have been forgotten altogether. For just as some Nazis awaited trial at Nuremburg, others-namely prominent, potentially useful scientists-were secretly smuggled into the country by the U.S. government to help prepare for an ostensibly impending "total war" with the Soviets. In fact, even an appearance at Nuremburg didn't rule out a trip to the States. Needless to say, what to do with potentially useful war criminals posed an unusual predicament. If such a claim sounds dubious, Jacobsen persuasively shows that it in fact happened and aptly frames the dilemma in terms of "Who would be hired, and who would be hanged?" Rife with hypocrisy, lies, and deceit, Jacobsen's story explores a conveniently overlooked bit of history the significance of which continues to resonate in the national security issues of today. (Feb.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved."
(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Additional Information
Subjects World War, 1939-1945 -- Technology.
Brain drain -- Germany -- History -- 20th century.
Scientists -- Recruiting -- Germany -- History -- 20th century.
Scientists -- Recruiting -- United States -- History -- 20th century.
Physicians -- Recruiting -- Germany -- History -- 20th century.
Nazis -- History -- 20th century.
War criminals -- Germany -- History -- 20th century.
Intelligence service -- United States -- History -- 20th century.
Military research -- History -- 20th century.
German Americans -- History -- 20th century.
Audiobooks.
Publisher New York :Hachette Audio,2013
Edition Unabridged.
Other Titles Operation Paperclip :
Contributors Hachette Audio (Firm), publisher.
Participants/Performers Read by the author.
Language English
Notes Unabridged.
Compact disc.
Description 16 audio discs (19 hr., 30 min.) : digital ; 4 3/4 in.
ISBN 9781619691537
1619691531
Other Classic View