The Library Catalog will be unavailable due to scheduled maintenance on Sunday, February 28 from 9 PM until midnight. We apologize for any inconvenience.

The Tudor Rose : Princess Mary, Henry VIII's sister

by Draskau, Jennifer,

Format: Print Book 2013
Availability: Unavailable 0 copies
Summary
Princess Mary Tudor, the "Rose of Christendom," led a romantic and tragic life; this is the first full biography of her and the role she and her descendents played in Tudor England

Known as the beautiful sister of Henry VIII and the spoiled darling of the court, Princess Mary Rose Tudor was married off to the ailing King of France against her will, and, after his death, had to fight for the right to marry Henry's favorite companion, Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk. After bearing him four children, Mary Rose died in the full flower of her beauty. Her adored husband, too busy to attend her funeral, soon married the 14-year-old fianc#65533;e of their only surviving son, who shortly thereafter died of TB. Her older daughter, Frances, was the mother of the ill-fated Jane Grey, the "Nine Days Queen." Her second daughter, Eleanor, was the grandmother of Fernando, 5th Earl of Derby, intended by Henry VIII to inherit the throne after Elizabeth. This is the previously untold story of Mary Tudor and the role she and her descendants played in Tudor England.

Published Reviews
Booklist Review: "The Tudor family tree continues to bear succulent fruit for both fiction and nonfiction writers. Draskau picks another worthy Tudor female for this biographical peek into the life of one of the supporting characters in the real-life dynastic drama. Henry VIII's beautiful younger sister, Princess Mary Rose, was subject to many of the same constraints as her more infamous friends and relatives. Pawned off at an early age to an aging Louis XII of France, she defied societal and familial expectations after his death by marrying, without her brother's knowledge or consent, the love of her life, Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk, eventually giving birth to four children. The author takes this biography a step further as she outlines the often tragic events of Mary's descendants. Long live the Tudor soap opera!--Flanagan, Margaret Copyright 2010 Booklist"
From Booklist, Copyright (c) American Library Association. Used with permission.
Publisher's Weekly Review: "Draskau is among the growing number of British historians examining England's most colorful dynasty through the prism of the lives of previously overlooked Tudor women. During her youth, Mary Rose, Henry VIII's younger sister, was promised to Charles of Castile, with whom Henry wished to forge a strong alliance. After peace was negotiated with France, Mary instead married Louis XII of France in 1514. Louis, more than 30 years older than Mary, died 82 days later. Risking her brother's wrath, and flouting social convention, Mary secretly married the man she loved, Sir Charles Brandon, before returning to England. Mary, regarded as an arbiter of fashion at Henry's court for years before Anne Boleyn eclipsed her, died in 1533 at age 37, leaving behind four children by Brandon. Their proximity to the English throne was, Draskau notes, a "poisoned chalice." One granddaughter, Lady Jane Grey, was executed by Mary I; Jane's younger sisters, Katherine and Mary, were imprisoned by Elizabeth I. Draskau's narrative emphasizes the extent to which women from elite families were regarded as pawns in early modern Europe, their marriages a seal to political and economic transac-tions between powerful men, their primary duty to bear a male heir. (Dec.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved."
(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Additional Information
Subjects Mary, -- Queen, consort of Louis XII, King of France, -- 1496-1533.
Princesses -- Great Britain -- Biography.
Queens -- France -- Biography.
Great Britain -- History -- Henry VIII, 1509-1547.
France -- History -- Louis XII, 1498-1515.
Publisher Stroud :2013
Language English
Description p. cm.
ISBN 9780752465845 (hbk.)
0752465848 (hbk.)
Other Classic View