Lynn Margulis : the life and legacy of a scientific rebel

Format: Print Book 2012
Availability: Available at 1 Library 1 of 1 copy
Available (1)
Location Collection Call #
CLP - Main Library Second Floor - Non-fiction QH31.M23 L96 2012
Location  CLP - Main Library
 
Collection  Second Floor - Non-fiction
 
Call Number  QH31.M23 L96 2012
 
 
Summary

Tireless, controversial, and hugely inspirational to those who knew her or encountered her work, Lynn Margulis was a scientist whose intellectual energy and interests knew no bounds. Best known for her work on the origins of eukaryotic cells, the Gaia hypothesis, and symbiogenesis as a driving force in evolution, her work has forever changed the way we understand life on Earth.

When Margulis passed away in 2011, she left behind a groundbreaking scientific legacy that spanned decades. In this collection, Dorion Sagan, Margulis's son and longtime collaborator, gathers together the voices of friends and colleagues to remark on her life and legacy, in essays that cover her early collaboration with James Lovelock, her fearless face-off with Richard Dawkins during the so-called "Battle of Balliol" at Oxford, the intrepid application of her scientific mind to the insistence that 9/11 was a false-flag operation, her affinity for Emily Dickinson, and more.

Margulis was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1983, received the prestigious National Medal of Science in 1999, and her papers are permanently archived at the Library of Congress. Less than a month before her untimely death, Margulis was named one of the twenty most influential scientists alive - one of only two women on this list, which include such scientists as Stephen Hawking, James Watson, and Jane Goodall.

Published Reviews
Publisher's Weekly Review: "There are two kinds of great scientists, writes former American Society of Microbiology president Moselio Schaechter in this eclectic, sometimes electrifying, book about biologist Lynn Margulis. There are those making "impressive experiments" and those making "groundbreaking theoretical syntheses." Margulis was the latter, notes Schaechter. Margulis fiercely championed evolutionary symbiogenesis, the merging of distinct organisms to form new organisms in swift, un-Darwinian leaps. Margulis was eventually proven right in some life forms. But her insistence that most evolution involves symbiogenesis led to a lifetime of debate. It also leads to some inspired writing in this book of essays, edited by Sagan, her son and cowriter (Dazzle Gradually: Reflectiions on the nature of Nature). "A dangerous liaison" is what Margulis felt drove species creation, writes Oxford paleobiologist Martin Brasier in one of the best essays. "A symbiosis between two distantly related organisms that want only swapped their genetic information to form completely new genetic strains." Some writing here reflects the idea that life is not a hierarchical tree, but a web, and embraces aspects of the controversial "Gaia" earth model which may put Traditional Darwinian scientists. But this is a captivating read for anyone interested in what powers great scientists. Color illus. (Oct.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved."

Additional Information
Subjects Margulis, Lynn, -- 1938-2011 -- Philosophy.
Biologists -- United States -- Biography.
Women biologists -- United States -- Biography.
Life -- Origin.
Publisher White River Junction, Vermont :Chelsea Green Publishing,2012
Contributors Margulis, Lynn, 1938-2011.
Sagan, Dorion, 1959-
Language English
Notes "A sciencewriters book."
Description 205 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 23 cm
Bibliography Notes Includes bibliographical references (pages 185-194) and index.
ISBN 9781603584463 (hardcover)
1603584463 (hardcover)
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