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I thought it was just me : women reclaiming power and courage in a culture of shame

by Brown, Brené.

Format: Print Book 2007
Availability: Available at 4 Libraries 4 of 7 copies
Available (4)
Location Collection Call #
Mt. Lebanon Public Library Non-Fiction 152.44 B75
Location  Mt. Lebanon Public Library
 
Collection  Non-Fiction
 
Call Number  152.44 B75
 
 
Northland Public Library Nonfiction 152.44082 B81
Location  Northland Public Library
 
Collection  Nonfiction
 
Call Number  152.44082 B81
 
 
Penn Hills Library Non-Fiction 152.44 BRO
Location  Penn Hills Library
 
Collection  Non-Fiction
 
Call Number  152.44 BRO
 
 
Sewickley Public Library Nonfiction 152.44 BRO 2007
Location  Sewickley Public Library
 
Collection  Nonfiction
 
Call Number  152.44 BRO 2007
 
 
 
Unavailable (3)
Location Collection Status
CLP - Main Library Mezzanine - Non-fiction CHECKED OUT
Location  CLP - Main Library
 
Collection  Mezzanine - Non-fiction
 
Status  CHECKED OUT
 
 
Monroeville Public Library Non-fiction CHECKED OUT
Location  Monroeville Public Library
 
Collection  Non-fiction
 
Status  CHECKED OUT
 
 
Shaler North Hills Library Non-Fiction CHECKED OUT
Location  Shaler North Hills Library
 
Collection  Non-Fiction
 
Status  CHECKED OUT
 
 
Summary
An affirming, revealing examination of the painful effects of shame--with new, powerful strategies that promise to transform a woman's abilitiy to love, parent, work, and build relationships.

Shame manifests itself in many ways. Addiction, perfectionism, fear and blame are just a few of the outward signs that Dr. Brené Brown discovered in her 6-year study of shame's effects on women. While shame is generally thought of as an emotion sequestered in the shadows of our psyches, I Thought It Was Just Me demonstrates the ways in which it is actually present in the most mundane and visible aspects of our lives--from our mental and physical health and body image to our relationships with our partners, our kids, our friends, our money, and our work.

After talking to hundreds of women and therapists, Dr. Brown is able to illuminate the myriad shaming influences that dominate our culture and explain why we are all vulnerable to shame. We live in a culture that tells us we must reject our bodies, reject our authentic stories, and ultimately reject our true selves in order to fit in and be accepted.

Outlining an empowering new approach that dispels judgment and awakens us to the genuine acceptance of ourselves and others, I Thought It Was Just Me begins a crucial new dialogue of hope. Through potent personal narratives and examples from real women, Brown identifies and explains four key elements that allow women to transform their shame into courage, compassion and connection. Shame is a dark and sad place in which to live a life, keeping us from connecting fully to our loved ones and being the women we were meant to be. But learning how to understand shame's influence and move through it toward full acceptance of ourselves and others takes away much of shame's power to harm.

It's not just you, you're not alone, and if you fight the daily battle of feeling like you are--somehow--just not "enough," you owe it to yourself to read this book and discover your infinite possibilities as a human being.

Published Reviews
Booklist Review: "Interviewing hundreds of women over six years, Brown was constantly faced with the shame just talking about shame induced. She explores how and why this universal human emotion is particularly present in women and how it affects behavior and relationships. She relates women's stories of shame about everything from obsession over appearance to sexual abuse, abuse of alcohol and drugs, and inadequacies as mothers, wives, and lovers. Brown offers insights and strategies for understanding shame and overcoming its power over women. She begins by defining shame and differentiating it from other emotions, and explores how shame is used and induced in the broader culture. She then identifies four elements of resilience: recognizing shame triggers, critical awareness, reaching out for help and connection with others, and speaking out about shame. She advises women on practicing courage, compassion, and connection to overcome cultures of fear, blame, and disconnection. An interesting look at a debilitating emotion that stunts the potential of too many women. --Vanessa Bush Copyright 2007 Booklist"
From Booklist, Copyright (c) American Library Association. Used with permission.
Publisher's Weekly Review: "University of Houston researcher and social worker Brown believes shame underlies the spread of depression, anxiety, eating disorders and much more, and drawing on a study of hundreds of women, she constructs a method for overcoming it. Brown defines shame as "the intensely painful feeling or experience of believing we are flawed and therefore unworthy of acceptance and belonging" and believes its spread has been created by conflicting and competing expectations about who women should be. Women feel shame about their appearance, about motherhood, family, money/work, health, stereotypes and trauma. Brown quotes liberally from the women she has studied and, most enlighteningly, gives examples from her own experiences juggling motherhood, career and her social life. These revelations underscore her belief in the importance of exposing shame and, through empathy, helping oneself and others move past it. She underscores the need to practice critical awareness, i.e., understanding the social forces that create shame in us can help us fight the sense of shame. Thus, Brown presents a spirited attack on the media and the beauty industry for presenting unrealistic images of women. Directing readers to focus on personal growth as opposed to unattainable perfection, Brown urges them to practice shame-resilience skills and teach them to their children. (Feb.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved"
(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Additional Information
Subjects Women -- Psychology.
Shame.
Publisher New York :Gotham Books,2007
Language English
Description xxvii, 305 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Bibliography Notes Includes bibliographical references (pages [286]-297) and index.
ISBN 1592402631 (hardcover)
9781592402632 (hardcover)
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