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What about Hitler? : wrestling with Jesus's call to nonviolence in an evil world

by Brimlow, Robert W., 1954-

Format: Print Book 2006
Availability: Available at 1 Library 1 of 2 copies
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Upper St. Clair Township Library Non-fiction 201.7 BRI
Location  Upper St. Clair Township Library
 
Collection  Non-fiction
 
Call Number  201.7 BRI
 
 
 
Unavailable (1)
Location Collection Status
CLP - Main Library Mezzanine - Non-fiction IN TRANSIT
Location  CLP - Main Library
 
Collection  Mezzanine - Non-fiction
 
Status  IN TRANSIT
 
 
Summary
Must Christians always turn the other cheek and resist violence? Is it ever justifiable for Christians to retaliate in the face of evil? Philosopher Robert Brimlow struggles with these questions in What about Hitler? The author skillfully integrates meditations on scriptural passages, personal reflections on his own challenges to live nonviolently, and a hard-hitting philosophical examination of pacifism and just-war doctrine.

Both Christian pacifists and defenders of just-war theory will appreciate this book. In addition, What about Hitler? will appeal to those interested in Christian ethics and discipleship, including students, pastors, and laity.
Contents
Foundations of the just war
The just war in contemporary thought
The good wars
Terror
The men behind the Hitler question
Success, failure, and hypocrisy
The Christian response
Elaboration
Elaborating upon the elaboration.

Published Reviews
Publisher's Weekly Review: "Those who critique pacifism usually ask one simple question: what about Hitler? Brimlow, an associate professor of philosophy at St. John Fisher College in Rochester, N.Y., grapples with that question as he reviews the philosophy and implementation of just war theories. The major difficulty, he argues, is that just war theory can be used to justify any war, including the ones against Hitler and Osama bin Laden. To those who argue that pacifism isn't effective in combating evil, Brimlow counters that by secular definitions, Jesus' nonviolence wasn't successful either. Brimlow argues that the Gospels are very clear: what Christians are called to do is to repay evil with good, even when doing so leads to death. A life of prayer and attention to God's presence in everyday life, as well as practicing peacemaking daily, are the spiritual practices that prepare Christians to turn the other cheek, and even die, when the time comes. Brimlow's treatise is carefully argued in academic fashion, even as he admits to personal difficulties living out the gospel as he understands it. The result is a lucid and thoughtful analysis that doesn't gloss over or minimize the outrageous demands of the Gospels. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved"
(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Additional Information
Series Christian practice of everyday life.
Subjects Nonviolence -- Religious aspects -- Christianity.
Peace -- Religious aspects -- Christianity.
Publisher Grand Rapids, Mich. :Brazos Press,2006
Language English
Description 192 pages ; 23 cm.
Bibliography Notes Includes bibliographical references (pages 191-192).
ISBN 1587430657 (pbk.)
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