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The devil kissed her : the story of Mary Lamb

by Watson, Kathy.

Format: Print Book 2004
Availability: Available at 1 Library 1 of 1 copy
Available (1)
Location Collection Call #
CLP - Main Library Second Floor - Non-fiction PR4865.L2 Z95 2004
Location  CLP - Main Library
 
Collection  Second Floor - Non-fiction
 
Call Number  PR4865.L2 Z95 2004
 
 
Summary
Kathy Watson explores Mary Lamb's famous crime and her remarkable relationship with her brother Charles. Author Mary Lamb, long considered by historians a mere adjunct to her brother Charles, was a woman of contradictions: fiercely domestic yet unmarried; maternal yet childless; a peaceful, loving woman susceptible to bouts of extreme violence. In this fascinating book, Kathy Watson traces the extraordinary intertwined lives of Mary Lamb and her brother Charles, authors of the perennial children's book Tales of Shakespeare. Their uncommonly close relationship-an ersatz marriage-was bound ever closer after Mary murdered their mother with a carving knife during a psychotic episode. Sharing the same constellation of friends-Coleridge and Wordsworth among them-yet plagued by Mary's manic depression, the Lambs' lives have long been shrouded in ambiguity. In The Devil Kissed Her, Watson documents the nature of Mary's mental illness and the terrible crime she committed in its haze, the lifelong devotion of Charles, and the brother and sister's dual existence in both the calm domesticity of their home life and the bedlam of nineteenth-century mental asylums.
Additional Information
Subjects Lamb, Mary, -- 1764-1847.
Lamb, Charles, -- 1775-1834 -- Family.
Authors, English -- 19th century -- Biography.
Psychiatric hospital patients -- Great Britain -- Biography.
Murderers -- Great Britain -- Biography.
Publisher New York :Jeremy P. Tarcher/Penguin,2004
Edition 1st Jeremy P. Tarcher ed.
Language English
Description 245 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
ISBN 1585423564
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