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Days of Jubilee : the end of slavery in the United States

by McKissack, Pat, 1944-2017

Format: Print Book 2003
Availability: Available at 13 Libraries 13 of 13 copies
Available (13)
Location Collection Call #
C.C. Mellor Memorial Library Children Non Fiction J 973.7 McK
Location  C.C. Mellor Memorial Library
 
Collection  Children Non Fiction
 
Call Number  J 973.7 McK
 
 
CLP - Allegheny Regional Children's Non-Fiction j E453.M28 2003
Location  CLP - Allegheny Regional
 
Collection  Children's Non-Fiction
 
Call Number  j E453.M28 2003
 
 
CLP - Homewood Children's African American j E453.M28 2003
Location  CLP - Homewood
 
Collection  Children's African American
 
Call Number  j E453.M28 2003
 
 
CLP - Main Library First Floor Children's Department - Non-Fiction Collection j E453.M28 2003
Location  CLP - Main Library
 
Collection  First Floor Children's Department - Non-Fiction Collection
 
Call Number  j E453.M28 2003
 
 
CLP - Squirrel Hill Children's Non-Fiction Collection j E453.M28 2003
Location  CLP - Squirrel Hill
 
Collection  Children's Non-Fiction Collection
 
Call Number  j E453.M28 2003
 
 
Carnegie Library of McKeesport - Duquesne Non Fiction J 973.7 M217
Location  Carnegie Library of McKeesport - Duquesne
 
Collection  Non Fiction
 
Call Number  J 973.7 M217
 
 
Dormont Public Library Juvenile Non-Fiction J 973.7 M28
Location  Dormont Public Library
 
Collection  Juvenile Non-Fiction
 
Call Number  J 973.7 M28
 
 
F.O.R. Sto-Rox Library Juvenile Non-Fiction JUV 973.7 McK
Location  F.O.R. Sto-Rox Library
 
Collection  Juvenile Non-Fiction
 
Call Number  JUV 973.7 McK
 
 
Northern Tier Regional Library Juvenile J 973.7 MCKIS
Location  Northern Tier Regional Library
 
Collection  Juvenile
 
Call Number  J 973.7 MCKIS
 
 
Northland Public Library Children's Nonfiction J 973.7 M21
Location  Northland Public Library
 
Collection  Children's Nonfiction
 
Call Number  J 973.7 M21
 
 
Plum Community Library Juvenile Non-Fiction J 973.3 MCK
Location  Plum Community Library
 
Collection  Juvenile Non-Fiction
 
Call Number  J 973.3 MCK
 
 
Sewickley Public Library Juvenile Nonfiction J 973.714 MCK 2003
Location  Sewickley Public Library
 
Collection  Juvenile Nonfiction
 
Call Number  J 973.714 MCK 2003
 
 
Western Allegheny Community Library Juvenile Non-Fiction J 973.7 MCK
Location  Western Allegheny Community Library
 
Collection  Juvenile Non-Fiction
 
Call Number  J 973.7 MCK
 
 
Summary
The McKissacks introduce young readers to the pivotal events leading up to and including the long awaited and glorious Days of Jubilee.

For two and a half centuries African-American slaves sang about, prayed for, and waited on their long anticipated freedom -- a day of Jubilee. But freedom didn't come for slaves at the same time. DAYS OF JUBILEE chronicles the various stages of U.S. emancipation beginning with those slaves who were freed for their service during the Revolutionary War, to those who were freed by the 13th Amendment to the Constitution. Using slave narratives, letters, diaries, military orders, and other documents, the McKissacks invite young readers to celebrate coming freedom and the Days of Jubilee.
Published Reviews
Booklist Review: "Gr. 5^-8. As this book clearly shows, there was no single day when slavery ended in the U.S. but a series of dates when groups and individual slaves celebrated their own "days of Jubilee." The discussion begins after the Revolutionary War, when many of the African Americans who had fought were freed, but it quickly moves on to the Civil War era. Each chapter begins with a quotation from a historical document, followed by a boxed story that tells, for example, of a slave family escaping to the Union army or a Boston church congregation receiving word that Lincoln had signed the Emancipation Proclamation. The quotations are sourced (though often identified only as "slave narrative"), but no source notes are given for the boxed narratives, which occasionally seem lightly fictionalized. The McKissacks do a remarkable job of explaining Civil War history as it relates to the end of slavery, and their lively account presents the war and its consequences in very human terms. For instance, it relates that in New York when, for the first time in history, photographs of the dead and dying soldiers on a battlefield went on display, "people cried out in horror." The balanced perspective, vivid telling, and well-chosen details give this book an immediacy that many history books lack. Illustrations include reproductions of many period photographs as well as paintings, prints, and documents, and a time line and a bibliography are appended. --Carolyn Phelan"
From Booklist, Copyright (c) American Library Association. Used with permission.
Publisher's Weekly Review: ""There wasn't one day when all the slaves were freed at the same time," write the McKissacks (Rebels Against Slavery) in this compelling chronicle of slavery's demise in America. "Whenever slaves learned they were free, that day became their Jubilee." The authors begin with the tenuous compromises made after the Revolutionary War and underscore historical events by weaving extensive quotes from slave narratives and the stories of contemporary persons. They include not only the famous, such as President Lincoln and abolitionist Frederick Douglass, but also citizens such as James Forten, an African-American businessman who "was shocked and dismayed when the United States Constitution was ratified without abolishing slavery" and who worked actively as an abolitionist throughout his life. Sideline perspectives like that of Southern slaveholder Mary Chestnut, whose diary documents her views on the Civil War, offer additional texture. Tinted sidebars provide expanded profiles, including that of Philip Coleman, an enslaved coachman who "prided himself on being a gentleman's gentleman" until he witnesses the death of white men at the hands of Union soldiers, and realizes that "his master is not invincible as once he'd thought" and runs away. The McKissacks ably balance the nation's gradual progress with heartrending examples of prejudice even after the Civil War that illustrate how far the nation still needed to go to achieve true equality. The inclusion of individual voices and life stories lends this well-researched overview of emancipation a sense of immediacy and relevance for today's readers. Ages 8-12. (Feb.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved"
(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Additional Information
Subjects Slaves -- Emancipation -- United States -- Juvenile literature.
Slaves -- Emancipation -- United States -- Sources -- Juvenile literature.
African Americans -- History -- To 1863 -- Juvenile literature.
African Americans -- History -- To 1863 -- Sources -- Juvenile literature.
Slavery -- History.
African Americans -- History -- To 1863.
United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Juvenile literature.
United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Sources -- Juvenile literature.
United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Sources.
Publisher New York :Scholastic Press,2003
Edition 1st ed.
Contributors McKissack, Fredrick.
Language English
Awards Coretta Scott King Honor Book, author, 2004
Description viii, 134 pages : illustrations ; 27 cm
Bibliography Notes Includes bibliographical references (pages 129-130) and index.
ISBN 059010764X
Other Classic View