We've added some new features. Please check out our recent changes.

The secret life of bees

by Kidd, Sue Monk.

Format: Large Print 2002
Availability: Available at 9 Libraries 10 of 10 copies
Available (10)
Location Collection Call #
Andrew Bayne Memorial Library Large Print LP Fic Kidd
Location  Andrew Bayne Memorial Library
 
Collection  Large Print
 
Call Number  LP Fic Kidd
 
 
Avalon Public Library Large Print LP FIC KIDD
Location  Avalon Public Library
 
Collection  Large Print
 
Call Number  LP FIC KIDD
 
 
Bethel Park Public Library Large Print LPKIDD SUE
Location  Bethel Park Public Library
 
Collection  Large Print
 
Call Number  LPKIDD SUE
 
 
Brentwood Library Large Print LARGE PRINT Kidd
Location  Brentwood Library
 
Collection  Large Print
 
Call Number  LARGE PRINT Kidd
 
 
CLP - Allegheny Regional Fiction FICTION Kidd, Su
Location  CLP - Allegheny Regional
 
Collection  Fiction
 
Call Number  FICTION Kidd, Su
 
 
CLP - Library for the Blind Large Print Books FICTION Kidd, Su CL 7513
Location  CLP - Library for the Blind
 
Collection  Large Print Books
 
Call Number  FICTION Kidd, Su CL 7513
 
 
CLP - Library for the Blind Large Print Books FICTION Kidd, Su, CL 7513
Location  CLP - Library for the Blind
 
Collection  Large Print Books
 
Call Number  FICTION Kidd, Su, CL 7513
 
 
Mt. Lebanon Public Library Large Print LP KIDD Sue Monk
Location  Mt. Lebanon Public Library
 
Collection  Large Print
 
Call Number  LP KIDD Sue Monk
 
 
Northern Tier Regional Library Large Print LP FIC KIDD
Location  Northern Tier Regional Library
 
Collection  Large Print
 
Call Number  LP FIC KIDD
 
 
Oakmont Carnegie Library Large Print LP KI
Location  Oakmont Carnegie Library
 
Collection  Large Print
 
Call Number  LP KI
 
 
Published Reviews
Booklist Review: "Kidd's warm debut is set in the sixties, just after the civil rights bill has been passed. Fourteen-year-old Lily Owens is haunted by the accidental death of her mother 10 years earlier, which left her in the care of her brutal, angry father but also Rosaleen, a strong, proud black woman. After Rosaleen is thrown into jail for standing up to a trio of racists, Lily helps her escape from the hospital where she is being kept, and the two flee to Tiburon, a town Lily believes her mother had a connection to. A clue among her mother's possessions leads Lily to the Boatwright sisters, three black women who keep bees. They give Lily and Rosaleen the haven they need, but Lily remains haunted by her mother's death and her own involvement in it. Although she fears her father is looking for her, Lily manages to find solace among the strong women who surround her and, eventually, the truth about her mother that she has been seeking. An uplifting story. --Kristine Huntley"
From Booklist, Copyright (c) American Library Association. Used with permission.
Publisher's Weekly Review: "Honey-sweet but never cloying, this debut by nonfiction author Kidd (The Dance of the Dissident Daughter) features a hive's worth of appealing female characters, an offbeat plot and a lovely style. It's 1964, the year of the Civil Rights Act, in Sylvan, S.C. Fourteen-year-old Lily is on the lam with motherly servant Rosaleen, fleeing both Lily's abusive father T. Ray and the police who battered Rosaleen for defending her new right to vote. Lily is also fleeing memories, particularly her jumbled recollection of how, as a frightened four-year-old, she accidentally shot and killed her mother during a fight with T. Ray. Among her mother's possessions, Lily finds a picture of a black Virgin Mary with "Tiburon, S.C." on the back so, blindly, she and Rosaleen head there. It turns out that the town is headquarters of Black Madonna Honey, produced by three middle-aged black sisters, August, June and May Boatwright. The "Calendar sisters" take in the fugitives, putting Lily to work in the honey house, where for the first time in years she's happy. But August, clearly the queen bee of the Boatwrights, keeps asking Lily searching questions. Faced with so ideally maternal a figure as August, most girls would babble uncontrollably. But Lily is a budding writer, desperate to connect yet fiercely protective of her secret interior life. Kidd's success at capturing the moody adolescent girl's voice makes her ambivalence comprehensible and charming. And it's deeply satisfying when August teaches Lily to "find the mother in (herself)" a soothing lesson that should charm female readers of all ages. (Jan. 28) Forecast: Blurbs from an impressive lineup of women writers Anita Shreve, Susan Isaacs, Ursula Hegi pitch this book straight at its intended readership. It's hard to say whether confusion with the similarly titled Bee Season will hurt or help sales, but a 10-city author tour should help distinguish Kidd. Film rights have been optioned and foreign rights sold in England and France. (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved"
(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Additional Information
Series Thorndike Press large print women's fiction series.
Subjects Teenage girls -- Fiction.
African American women -- Fiction.
Maternal deprivation -- Fiction.
Race relations -- Fiction.
Beekeepers -- Fiction.
Sisters -- Fiction.
Large type books.
South Carolina -- Fiction.
Publisher Waterville, Me. :Thorndike Press,2002
Language English
Description 464 pages (large print) ; 22 cm.
ISBN 0786243066 (lg. print : hc)
Other Classic View