An unquiet mind

by Jamison, Kay R.

Format: Print Book 1996.
Availability: Available 4 of 6 copies
Available (4)
Location Collection Call #
Braddock Carnegie Library Non Fiction 616.89 JAM
Location  Braddock Carnegie Library
Collection  Non Fiction
Call Number  616.89 JAM
Carnegie Library of Homestead Non Fiction 616.89 Jami
Location  Carnegie Library of Homestead
Collection  Non Fiction
Call Number  616.89 Jami
Millvale Community Library Adult Non Fiction PSY 161.89 JAM
Location  Millvale Community Library
Collection  Adult Non Fiction
Call Number  PSY 161.89 JAM
Scott Township Library Nonfiction 616.895 JAM
Location  Scott Township Library
Collection  Nonfiction
Call Number  616.895 JAM
Unavailable (2)
Location Collection Status
Dormont Public Library Non-Fiction CHECKED OUT
Location  Dormont Public Library
Collection  Non-Fiction
Oakmont Carnegie Library Non-Fiction CHECKED OUT
Location  Oakmont Carnegie Library
Collection  Non-Fiction


In her bestselling classic, An Unquiet Mind, Kay Redfield Jamison changed the way we think about moods and madness.

Dr. Jamison is one of the foremost authorities on manic-depressive (bipolar) illness;nbsp;she has also experienced it firsthand. For evennbsp;while she was pursuing her career in academic medicine, Jamison found herself succumbing to the same exhilarating highs and catastrophic depressions that afflicted many of her patients, as her disorder launched her into ruinous spending sprees, episodes of violence, and an attemptednbsp;suicide.

Here Jamison examines bipolar illness from the dual perspectives of the healer and the healed, revealing both its terrors and the cruel allure that at times prompted her to resist taking medication. An Unquiet Mind is a memoir of enormous candor, vividness, and wisdom--a deeply powerful book that has both transformed and saved lives.

Published Reviews
Booklist Review: "Psychologist Jamison's controversial Touched with Fire (1993) explored the hypothetical link between artistic creativity and mood disorders, speculating that manic-depressive illness, which may be inherited, somehow enables art while ravaging the artist. Perhaps written in response to opponents of biological psychiatry and accusations of romanticizing the creative possibilities of serious mental illness, her new book recounts her own frightening experience as a manic depressive--a condition she regards as genetically rooted and has publicly disclosed only recently because of her professional position. Although Jamison illuminates the disorder's addictive aspects (which stem from the unusual clarity of thought and increased capabilities it can cause in the manic phase), much of her memoir recalls the horrors of intense depression, which often lead to suicide attempts, as indeed they did in her case ("My body is uninhabitable," she recalls feeling, "raging and weeping and full of destruction and wild energy gone amok" ). Her intermittent refusals to continue prescribed medication cost her relationships and threatened her sanity, but finally, she accepted a Lithium-dependent, relatively stable life. Her account is an act of both personal and professional bravery. (Reviewed August 1995)0679443746Whitney Scott"
From Booklist, Copyright (c) American Library Association. Used with permission.
Publisher's Weekly Review: "Johns Hopkins psychiatry professor Jamison, whose Touched with Fire addressed the link between manic-depressive illness and creativity, offers a poignant and powerful memoir of her own struggles with and triumphs over the disease. Her story suggests that, yes, with lithium as regulator, psychotherapy as sanctuary, professional support and love, manic-depressive illness can be managed. The illness is often genetic, and Jamison's exuberant but depressive father was a portent. Her first wave of mania came in high school, but college was a struggle marked by violent moods and passions, and grad school pushed her over the edge. During her first decade on lithium, the drug's side effects blurred her vision so that she could concentrate only on journal articles or poetry. Eventually she attempted suicide. The author's traumas helped drive her academic passions; her work also led her to a happy marriage. She has not had children of her own and raises eloquent‘unanswerable‘questions about manic-depressives bearing children. 75,000 first printing; Literary Guild and Doubleday Book Club alternates; author tour. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved"
(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Additional Information
Subjects Jamison, Kay R. -- Mental health.
Manic-depressive persons -- United States -- Biography.
Women college teachers -- United States -- Biography.
Publisher New York :Vintage Books,1996.
Edition 1st Vintage Books ed.
Language English
Notes Reprint. Originally published: New York : A.A. Knopf, 1995.
Description 223 pages ; 22 cm
ISBN 0679763309
Other Classic View